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29 results for city of london found within the Blog

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A Bit of Bishopsgate

Posted by Guy Fairbank on 5th March 2020 in Design | Bishopsgate,Victoria and Albert Museum,V&A,Pre-Great Fire buildings,Paul Pindar,Medieval houses,Stuart,Great Fire
Visit the Victoria and Albert Museum in South Kensington and, among its many treasures, you’ll find a rare survival of pre-Great Fire architecture from the city of london. Peter Pindar’s house originally stood on Bishopsgate, about where Liverpool Street Station now stands. When the station was developed the Chairman and Directors of the Great Eastern Railway Company gave it to the museum.  It’s made of oak and dates from around 1600, when merchant Paul Pindar had it built - more of him later. The impressive full-height windows would have originally been glazed, either with imported glass or local greenish glass. The semi-circular window shap...
 

Tunnelling South

Posted by fairbankguy on 14th January 2018 in History | empire windrush,clapham,underground,tube,hidden london,blitz
Thanks to london Transport Museum’s Hidden london programme, a number of lost Tube stations and forgotten tunnels are occasionally open to the public. One such gem is Clapham South’s deep-level shelter. Descending 180 steps and 36m down you get to an engineering marvel: a series of tunnels built during World War Two to protect london’s citizens during the Blitz. At the height of the Luftwaffe’s bombing raids the Government commissioned 8 shelters, capable of holding some 64,000 citizens and well away from any potential raid. They employed miners to hand dig 2x 30m vertical shafts down. Then the miners created 2 horizontal shafts, each o...
 

Bath time, Londinium style

Posted by fairbankguy on 1st May 2017 in History | archaeology,city-of-london,roman
Under an undistinguished office block in Lower Thames Street, opposite the Custom House and below St Dunstan-in-the-East lies a hidden gem of Roman london: a Roman house and bathhouse. It lies some way back from the river but in its heyday this building complex would have overlooked the River Thames from its hillside location. It may have been a ‘mansio’, which offered comfortable accommodation to officials - a bit like the nearby Premier Inn! When you venture down there’s a surprising amount to see. What survives are the north and east wings of the L-shaped house but there’s no trace of the west wing. The east side was kept warm with u...
 

Feeling CoLD

Posted by fairbankguy on 22nd August 2015 in Food | gin,distillery,city of london,gin tour,city of london distillery
In Bride Lane, a narrow street off Fleet Street, you’ll find the city’s only gin distillery. Walk down the steps and it seems you’re entering a smart gentlemen’s club, with leather sofas and dimmed lighting. A quick glance to the right, however, and you’ll spot a still, all gleaming copper and twisted pipework. In recent years gin has enjoyed a bit of a renaissance. It was only a few years ago that Beefeater was the sole london maker but now a whole load of boutique businesses have cropped up: Sipsmith, Portobello Road and Bloom. It seems the thirst for a G & T is unquenchable! The city of london Distillery was founded in November...
 

The Senate and Students of london

Posted by fairbankguy on 25th November 2017 in Higher Education | art-deco,senate-house,ww2
  Dominating the leafy and literary area of Bloomsbury is the monumental Senate House. It’s part of the University of london and was built in the 1930s by that great architect of the london Underground, Charles Holden. It was built on land given by the Dukes of Bedford and funded by, amongst others, the Rockefeller family, Marks and Spencer and city livery companies. The shell of the building was made from steel, encased by hardy Portland stone, which has remarkable anti-pollution qualities: it’s only been cleaned twice in its 80 years. When it was completed in 1937 the Senate House was the tallest building (64m high) after St Paul’s an...
 

A Small But Important Document

Posted by fairbankguy on 25th February 2017 in History | archives,city-of-london,guildhall,parchment,unesco,willam-i
One of the oldest documents the Corporation hold is a slip of parchment that's over  950 years old It is the Charter of King William I to the city of london and it is the oldest document in the Corporation’s archives. After defeating Harold II at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William marched on london. He never conquered the city - that’s why he’s never referred to as ‘William the Conqueror’ there. Instead he came to an agreement with the city that he would uphold the rights and privileges of all londoners if they would acknowledge him as sovereign - which they did. Apart from its amazing survival, what makes this document so remarkab...
 
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