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5 results for death found within the Blog

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A Palace of Riches

Posted by Guy Fairbank on 16th December 2020 in History | richmond,surrey,henry vii,henry viii,elizabeth i,shene,sheen,tudor
...Henry’s death his son Henry VIII used it infrequently. After all, he did have over 60 palaces to choose from. He gave it to his fourth wife Anne of Cleves as part of her generous divorce settlement. She used furnishings from Thomas Cromwell’s estate to fill it with - ironic, given his downfall was caused by the failure of the marriage.  Later, Henry’s daughter Elizabeth I lived here. It was her favourite palace and where she died on 24 March 1603.  One reason for her liking of Richmond Palace may have been down to the work of her godson Sir John Harrington: he installed one of the first flushing lavatories. It was known as the Ajax - a pun on the wo...
 

A whiff of Bauhaus

Posted by fairbankguy on 26th June 2017 in Arts | bauhaus,cannon-street,gropius,nii-haw,vitrolite
...until his death in 1969.    ...
 

A Gem of a Gallery

Posted by fairbankguy on 1st June 2018 in Christianity | diamond-jubilee,funeral-effigies,monarchy,treasures,westminster,westminster-abbey
...ing whose death in 1509 was cheered by the people.  Further on are wax effigies of the Stuart kings: a tall Charles II, wearing the oldest example of the Order of the Garter, and a diminutive William III beside his more stately wife Mary II.  But it’s not the wonderful exhibits that steal the show, it’s the view.  As you walk around there are the most wonderful sights to see: you can gaze down onto the 13th century Cosmati pavement, the shrine of Edward the Confessor and the many memorials in Poets’ Corner.  Best of all, is the vista of the gothic nave, described by the Poet Laureate Sir John Betjeman as “the finest view in Europe.” I couldn...
 

Hidden Coade in the City

Posted by fairbankguy on 5th April 2018 in Design | coade,coade-stone,tours,walks,mrs coade,skinners company,lambeth,watermen,vintners,lion brewery,twinings
...s. On her death the business struggled to survive and eventually closed in 1840. With that, the secret of her formula was lost until the 1990s, when researchers managed to rediscover her ingenious composition. Thanks to this, conservators at the National Trust and English Heritage  have replaced lost sculptures with new Coade stone.       ...
 

Dead fascinating

Posted by fairbankguy on 16th August 2018 in Places & Travel | archives,brompton,catacombs,cemeteries,death,graves,tours,the who,kit lambert,john snow,emmeline pankhurst
...  Brompton Cemetery lies within the shadow of Chelsea FC’s football stadium but you’ll find many more famous people buried under its 40 acres. It’s one of the 7 great cemeteries that sprung up around London from the 1830s to solve the chronic shortage of burial plots. Highgate Cemetery might be the most famous one but Brompton gives it a run for its money. The construction of the cemeteries coincided with the coming of the railways, which meant the trains could transport the stone and granite needed to construct the impressive monuments that fill the grounds. For the first time funeral directors sprung up, and you could order your memorial f...
 
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