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32 results for hidden london found within the Blog

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A Palace of Riches

Posted by Guy Fairbank on 16th December 2020 in History | richmond,surrey,henry vii,henry viii,elizabeth i,shene,sheen,tudor
Richmond-upon-Thames is one of the best places to live in london. Its riverside walks, fine views, handsome houses and hidden lanes make it an attractive place to live - it’s why some of our best-loved actors choose to call it home. 500 years ago King Henry VII thought so too, and had Richmond Palace built for himself and his young family. It had been a favourite home of royals before that, when it was originally known as Sheen Palace. In fact Edward III died there on 21 June 1377. When Anne of Bohemia, the much-loved wife of Edward’s grandson Richard II died of the plague, Richard had it pulled down. It was later rebuilt by Henry V, then comple...
 

In a City Courtyard…

Posted by fairbankguy on 21st April 2018 in Christianity | archaeology,ww2,agatha christie,vintners,foster lane,st vedast,wren,christopher wren
Within a stone’s throw of St Paul’s Cathedral stands the impressive church of St Vedast-alias-Foster. St Vedast was an obscure 6th century Flemish saint and Foster is the English corruption of that name, and on Foster Lane you’ll find this Wren church. The church itself is well worth a look inside, as it contains many 17th century furnishings which have been taken from other City churches. The steeple is very fine too. It’s been attributed to Nicholas Hawksmoor but there’s no actual evidence. What marks the church out is what is found to the north of the entrance. Fountain Court is a charming little garden, hidden away from the hustle...
 

River Rubbish

Posted by fairbankguy on 8th April 2017 in History | roman
When the Romans arrived in Britain in AD43 they looked for a place to found a settlement along the Thames. A patch of high ground to the north, between two rivers, was the ideal spot - and so the city of Londinium was founded. Those rivers were the Fleet and Walbrook, two sources of drinking water. Today you can still follow the courses of those lost rivers: the Fleet flows into the Thames at Blackfriars, while the Walbrook begins around Finsbury Circus and ends up going down Dowgate, by Cannon Street.The Walbrook may originally have acted as a sort of boundary. Whatever its purpose was, this waterlogged valley has preserved some remarkable finds un...
 

The Senate and Students of london

Posted by fairbankguy on 25th November 2017 in Higher Education | art-deco,senate-house,ww2
  Dominating the leafy and literary area of Bloomsbury is the monumental Senate House. It’s part of the University of london and was built in the 1930s by that great architect of the london Underground, Charles Holden. It was built on land given by the Dukes of Bedford and funded by, amongst others, the Rockefeller family, Marks and Spencer and City livery companies. The shell of the building was made from steel, encased by hardy Portland stone, which has remarkable anti-pollution qualities: it’s only been cleaned twice in its 80 years. When it was completed in 1937 the Senate House was the tallest building (64m high) after St Paul’s an...
 

A Small But Important Document

Posted by fairbankguy on 25th February 2017 in History | archives,city-of-london,guildhall,parchment,unesco,willam-i
One of the oldest documents the Corporation hold is a slip of parchment that's over  950 years old It is the Charter of King William I to the City of london and it is the oldest document in the Corporation’s archives. After defeating Harold II at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William marched on london. He never conquered the City - that’s why he’s never referred to as ‘William the Conqueror’ there. Instead he came to an agreement with the City that he would uphold the rights and privileges of all londoners if they would acknowledge him as sovereign - which they did. Apart from its amazing survival, what makes this document so remarkab...
 

Bethlem Burial Ground

Posted by fairbankguy on 21st July 2015 in History | crossrail,liverpool street,osteoarchaeology,black history,bedlam
  Crossrail is Europe’s largest construction project. As work continues archaeologists from the Museum of london have had the chance to investigate Bethel Burial Ground, near Liverpool Street Station. From 1569 and for another 170 years some 20,000 corpses were buried, mainly from the working and middle classes. During that time london’s population quadrupled to half a million. Archaeologists have made some fascinating discoveries as they dug up 3,000 bodies. They haven't identified any of the corpses but volunteers have trawled through some of the parish records of the 124 churches. Many of the deceased were not londoners but came from as fa...
 
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